Our little paradisaical island.

Image via Wikipedia

Image via Wikipedia

 Mauritius is a tiny dot situated in the Indian Ocean.  First discovered by the Portuguese and exploited by the Dutch, this small island flourished under the rule of Mahe de Labourdonnais and progressed further during the reign of the British governors.  Today Mauritius – an area of one thousand eight hundred and sixty-five square kilometres – has a population of about one million two hundred thousand people.  For me, living in this versatile and unique country is really a great privilege although a few complications might arise sometimes.

 

Image via Wikipedia

Mauritian culture is doubtlessly something to cherish.  Being a multi-ethnic society, our island teems with people of different religions like the Hindus, Muslims, Christians, and Chinese.  Their several rites and rituals, ceremonies and festivals ranging from the colourful Holi to the red Spring Festival not only make up our rich cultural heritage but also bring a lot of joy to the inhabitants.  Distributing happiness in the form of sweets in moments of festivities is indeed one of the activities I like best.

Image via Wikipedia

Another beautiful aspect of Mauritius lies in our topography and in the fact that our country is surrounded by the sea.  We can travel to the seaside within merely a one hour trip unlike other large nations, for example, India.  Our sandy beaches, blue lagoons and sunny climate are precious assets because of which thousands of tourists throng to Mauritius in the summer specially.  Moreover, there are green grass, plants and trees almost everywhere in the countryside which regulates the balance of nature; thus helping towards a fresh environment.  The natural beauty of the island is further underlined by the awe-inspiring scenery offered by our mountains.  In fact, if ever I am frustrated, I actually feel soothed looking at the magnificent view of the setting sun on the “Trois Mamelles” from my window.  In addition, when compared to other countries, Mauritius is a place where the people live in peace and harmony.

 

Image by subzi73 via Flickr

Indeed, although rare riots do break as it did in the year 1999, the latter also subside luckily rather quickly.  Since very long, Mauritians have been coping with problems which have mostly ignited by religious fanatics who try to disrupt peace prevailing over the island by spreading outrageous rumours most probably.  However, the majority stand unified and thus we are able to surmount the obstacle easily.  I am proud of my motherland for possessing such a valuable quality and I really think that Mauritius is a good example ‘unity in diversity’.

 

Image via Wikipedia

In my opinion, living in Mauritius is a honour also because it is one of the few countries which has succeeded in shifting from the status of a developing country to that of a newly industrialised land.  Several new facilities are now provided to the inhabitants and new infrastructures are being set up to suit the population.  For instance, a cyber-city is under construction at Ebene which will help to improve our general knowledge in Information Technology.  Furthermore, this advance will allow for more efficient and quick work, giving a better economic output if applied in various other fields as well.  At the same time, such development will upgrade our standard of living. 

 

Image by subzi73 via Flickr

However, social degradation is gradually becoming a reality as more and more Mauritian youngsters try to imitate the tourists only for the sake of being fashionable.  This develops into bad habits such as smoking, drinking and taking drugs on a regular basis.  The teenagers at a later stage find that they have either become nicotine or drug addict or alcoholic – it is then too late.  If no action is taken to reduce the negative impacts on tourism, social evils will continue to increase in Mauritius.  I feel that living in the island also means to help our fellow friends who are in trouble by making them aware of the dangers involved in such indulgence and by sensitising the public in general through campaigns.

Image by subzi73 via Flickr

3
Liked it
  • ken bultman on Jun 8, 2009

    Thanks for the educational tour. It’s a new one for me and sounds like a delightful island.

  • Ram Aiyar on Jun 21, 2009

    Sounds like a delightful place notwithstanding a few issues.

Leave a Comment
comments powered by Disqus

Hi there!

Hello! Welcome to Authspot, the spot for creative writing.
Read some stories and poems, and be sure to subscribe to our feed!

Find the Spot

Loading