This is just a little analysis of the poem "A Poison Tree" which was written by William Blake a long time ago. William Blake was a famous romance poet, conjuring up more than just the "Poison Tree".
Enjoy and I hope it helps.

A Poison Tree   -  William Blake

 

I was angry with my friend:
I told my wrath, my wrath did end.
I was angry with my foe:
I told it not, my wrath did grow.

And I watered it in fears,
Night & morning with my tears;
And I sunned it with smiles,
And with soft deceitful wiles.

And it grew both day and night,
Till it bore an apple bright.
And my foe beheld it shine,
And he knew that it was mine,

And into my garden stole,
When the night had veiled the pole;
In the morning glad I see

My foe outstretched beneath the tree

Stanza 1

William Blake speaks of someone, his friend and his foe, whom has he is angry with.

When he says ‘I told my wrath, my wrath did end’ after he said he was angry with his friend, he is saying he was able to get over being angry with his friend and forgot about it. Although, it is quite the opposite when he mentions’ I told it not, and my wrath did grow’. Blake is saying that with his enemy, he allowed himself to get angry, and therefore, his wrath did grow.

 

Stanza 2

In this stanza, Blake begins to make his anger grow and he takes pleasure in it, comparing his anger with something, in this case, a tree or plant. The speaker says he ‘sunned it with smiles’ and ‘and with soft, deceitful wiles’. This means he is creating an illusion with his enemy saying he is pretending to be friendly to seduce and bring him closer.

 

Stanza 3

‘And it grew both day and night’ and ‘til it bore an apple bright’ are meaning that his illusion with his enemy is growing and growing until it became a strong and tempting thing. His illusion has a metaphor and it is an apple. After, his foe believes it shines, which means he thinks it’s true and means something, and takes Blake illusion seriously. ‘And he knew it was mine’ suggests that he really thinks Blake is his friend.

 

Stanza 4

Being the last stanza, Blake needed to come up with a conclusion. He has used the two lines ‘in the morning glad I see’ and ‘my foe outstretched beneath the tree’ to say that his foe finally fell to his tempting illusion and metaphorically, consumed his poison apple and died. So, obviously, his malicious intentions were hidden behind illusion and he prevailed over his enemy.

20
Liked it
  • demi on May 26, 2011

    NICE!!!! :)
    HELPED ME TREMENDOUSLY :D DD

  • charlie reed on Sep 19, 2011

    this is a stupid poem. fuck this shit

  • DUNNO on Feb 14, 2012

    THANK U so much needed this 4 hw!! :-)

  • bored hw guy on Mar 15, 2012

    thx

  • Mikhaila Mahoney on Mar 15, 2012

    omg i love this poem! ty so much for posting ur analysis. Call me ! 703 568 2912 we can hang out babe

  • yzy on Mar 27, 2012

    fuck all the comments

  • Heather Cook on May 29, 2012

    Heather Rochelle Cook
    7th April 2012
    “The Poison Tree”
    William Blake uses a very distinct tone in this poem. It is one of maliciousness and bitterness. Blake uses an, (a a, b b) rhyme scheme in this poem that also ends with a rhyming couplet. In stanza one, Blake is showing the audience how different one might act towards ones’ friend and how they may use a different course of action when referring to one of their “foes”. He can talk to his friend about his “wrath” but has a harder time telling his foe. In stanza two, Blake is referring maybe to a tree that grows as he “watered it with fears…sunned it with smiles and soft deceitful wiles”. He is stating there that his enemy might not even know he is being tricked by the speaker, causing his foe to get closer. This to me is what the quote, “Keep your friends close, and keep your enemies closer” means. With that being said, I believe this is the cause of Blake’s deviousness. He wants his foe to fall in his trap. “And it grew both day and night”, is simply saying that the longer that you hold in your hurts or true feelings, the stronger they might grow inside of you, until you finally burst. He shows this in line ten by using an apple sprouting from the tree, “till it bore an apple bright”. Finally, the speakers’ plan has worked. His foe took the apple like he had hoped, and because the tree was nourished around nothing but hate and anger surrounding its environment, it sprouts a “bad apple”. In this poem the bad apple is a “poisoned apple”, and in result kills the speakers’ enemy. This can very easily relate to two life lessons that come to my mind. If you build up your emotions to the point where they explode, the explosion itself might remain harmed forever. I can also simply compare this to the average “everyday life”. If you are a growing adolescent in a traumatized or stressful household while learning to grow, things like temper, hate or everyday usages in your household can adapt inside of you and has a lot to do with the person you grow up to be. Blake planted a bad seed and basically grew it throughout the hardships of an enemy, and therefore the tree grew into, “A Poison Tree”. In reality, the way that we are nourished during early childhood can someday definitely bring out our true demeanors.

  • Becky on Jun 9, 2012

    why the hell did you say f this poem if you clicked on the website you ungrateful bastard

  • shamia on Jun 9, 2012

    r u a lesbian Mikhailia Mohoney because i am a girl and i wrote this analysis so no i dont want to ‘hang out’

  • im a killer curry and i like durry on Aug 1, 2012

    u suck balls!!!!!

  • Brian Johnson on Oct 5, 2012

    AC/DC BLAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH BACK IN BLACKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKKK YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHH AC/DC AC/DC

  • Angus Young on Oct 5, 2012

    AC/DC ya

  • malcolm Yong on Oct 5, 2012

    Back IN Black mate

  • Phil Rudd on Oct 5, 2012

    dude, AC/DC

  • Cliff Williams on Oct 5, 2012

    For Those About To Rock WWWWWEEEEEEEE SAAAALLLUTTTTEEEE YYYYYYYYYYOOOUUUU Shoot

  • ali on Jan 10, 2013

    it is a beautiful and esay poem
    blake want to show us the advantage and disadvantage of bad emotion and he prohibited us from such type of emotion
    the speaker surrounding to apple tree
    which is an illusion used here in this poem

  • Amelia on Jan 31, 2013

    “The Poison Tree”
    William Blake uses a very distinct tone in this poem. It is one of maliciousness and bitterness. Blake uses an, (a a, b b) rhyme scheme in this poem that also ends with a rhyming couplet. In stanza one, Blake is showing the audience how different one might act towards ones’ friend and how they may use a different course of action when referring to one of their “foes”. He can talk to his friend about his “wrath” but has a harder time telling his foe. In stanza two, Blake is referring maybe to a tree that grows as he “watered it with fears…sunned it with smiles and soft deceitful wiles”. He is stating there that his enemy might not even know he is being tricked by the speaker, causing his foe to get closer. This to me is what the quote, “Keep your friends close, and keep your enemies closer” means. With that being said, I believe this is the cause of Blake’s deviousness. He wants his foe to fall in his trap. “And it grew both day and night”, is simply saying that the longer that you hold in your hurts or true feelings, the stronger they might grow inside of you, until you finally burst. He shows this in line ten by using an apple sprouting from the tree, “till it bore an apple bright”. Finally, the speakers’ plan has worked. His foe took the apple like he had hoped, and because the tree was nourished around nothing but hate and anger surrounding its environment, it sprouts a “bad apple”. In this poem the bad apple is a “poisoned apple”, and in result kills the speakers’ enemy. This can very easily relate to two life lessons that come to my mind. If you build up your emotions to the point where they explode, the explosion itself might remain harmed forever. I can also simply compare this to the average “everyday life”. If you are a growing adolescent in a traumatized or stressful household while learning to grow, things like temper, hate or everyday usages in your household can adapt inside of you and has a lot to do with the person you grow up to be. Blake planted a bad seed and basically grew it throughout the hardships of an enemy, and therefore the tree grew into, “A Poison Tree”. In reality, the way that we are nourished during early childhood can someday definitely bring out our true demeanors.

    Read more: http://authspot.com/poetry/poetry-analysis-a-poison-tree-by-william-blake/#ixzz2JaCEE5aX

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