First used by man in Polynesia from where it spread to India — the so called “the reed which gives honey without bees” were found in India in 510 BC when the Emperor Darius of Persia invaded India.

Sugar cane and sugar beets are the most common sources of natural sugar. Sugar is one of the commodities that we have consumed from day to day, it has a sweet characteristic that add flavours to our foods and drinks. This plentiful sweetener although not necessary is very desirable because it adds palatability to the day’s meals — those sweet luscious deserts such as cakes, chocolates, cookies and so much more makes your meals complete.

 

Sugar cane grown primarily in the tropical and sub-tropical zones in the southern hemisphere, while sugar beet is grown mainly in the temperate zones of the northern hemisphere. More than one hundred countries produce sugar, 80 percent of which is made from sugar cane. The costs of producing sugar from the sugar cane are generally lower than in respect of processing sugar beets, and currently, 70 percent of the world’s sugar is consumed in the countries of origin, whilst the balance is traded on the world markets.

Top five producers and exporters in 2008/09:

 

First used by man in Polynesia from where it spread to India — the so called “the reed which gives honey without bees” were found in India in 510 BC when the Emperor Darius of Persia invaded India. It was then that the discovery of cane sugar was closely guarded secret whilst the Persian Emperor exported the finished product to any countries for a big profit. In 642 AD that guarded secret was broken when Arab people invaded Persia – they found sugar cane being grown and learnt show sugar was made.

In England, the first sugar was recorded in 1099 — as the western European countries expanded their trade with the east, and so the importation of sugar. Sugar production was a very lucrative business to the extent that sugar was so called ‘white gold’ and government enjoyed the vast taxed collected out of sugar industry. It was then on the 14th century that Cyprus became the major producer of sugar by using the slave labour on their sugar cane plantations – Syrian and Arab slaves the main sources of labour. Eventually, sugar made its way to Sicily where a familiar pattern of enslaved or coerced labour, relatively large land units, and well-developed long-range commerce was established—it was then became the model for Spain and Portuguese as they colonized the Mediterranean, Caribbean and the Asian continent.   

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  • Jenilia12 on Feb 4, 2010

    Good post.
    Thanks to share this one.

  • TheWriter14 on Feb 21, 2010

    Awesome share dcart, very good!

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