Aside from marking thresholds, doors are the first impression. You walk through them every single day, but the average person probably doesn’t pay attention to how ornate and unique a door is. From stained glass to wood entry doors, styles vary, making things difficult for the typical homeowner. Here are a few unique door styles to consider.

Aside from marking thresholds, doors are the first impression. You walk through them every single day, but the average person probably doesn’t pay attention to how ornate and unique a door is. From stained glass to wood entry doors, styles vary, making things difficult for the typical homeowner. Here are a few unique door styles to consider.

French Doors

Originating in France in the 17th century, French doors were originally windows that reached down to the floor and led out onto small balconies. They eventually found their way to England and the rest of the world. After the Renaissance, these floor-length windows were turned into the doors we now know and love.

French doors consist of multiple small windows set into a door. Each pane of glass is separated by a wooden frame, or mullion. There is no limit to the number of small windows (also known as lights) that a French door can have.

The glass diminishes the amount of privacy but provides ample natural light. When used as patio or exterior doors, glass is often double-paned for added insulation. Inside, French doors provide an open, connected feel throughout the home.

Pocket Doors

Dating back to the late 1800s, pocket doors are seeing a recent rise in popularity.

The main reason for the resurgence in pocket doors is their space-saving characteristics. These doors are not set on hinges nor do they swing open. Instead they slide in and out of a space—a pocket—hidden within the wall. Pocket doors can come in either single or double door styles. The average hinge door can take up about 10 square feet, making pocket doors ideal for optimizing small spaces.

Dutch Doors

First developed in Holland in the 17th century, these very rustic doors were originally built as entry doors but became popular in the kitchen doorway. This was before screen doors were invented. Farmers left doors open for sunlight and ventilation but that often meant letting in stray farm animals and insects or letting out small children.

The Dutch door, also known as a stable door or half door, is divided in half horizontally. This allows the homeowner to open the top half while leaving the bottom half closed. You can let in that sunlight and fresh air and keep your pets and kids inside all at once.

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